Magic Moura and Amsterdam

Photo: Matthews Childs/Reuters
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The third instalment of our countdown to Madrid is here. Today we have spoken to our panel about the Mouracle in Amsterdam. 

This is the panel: Theo Delaney is the host of a Spurs podcast, Paul Smith is the host of a Spurs website, Rob White is the son of Spurs legend John White, and Micky Hazard and David Howells used to play in our famous shirt. 

IF YOU HAVEN'T READ THE FIRST TWO EDITION'S OF OUR CHAMPIONS LEAGUE SPECIAL, YOU CAN READ

Samlebilde

Erlend: - Can you describe the feeling you had when the full time whistle went in Amsterdam? 

Rob White: - Impossible. Disbelief. Shock. This just doesn’t happen to Tottenham. Joy. Very emotional. 

- I’m not at all religious, but before going out to watch the match, I’d held an old pair of my dad’s boots, which I have on display at home, and spent a few quiet minutes “communicating” with my dad. I’d asked him to help out if we needed him, so at the final whistle I remembered to thank him. I’m pretty sure he’ll be there in Madrid, along with Danny, Dave, Bill Nic, Bobby, Peter, and all of the others!

- Even better than the semi-final 

Micky Hazard: - As a fan I think it’s the greatest feeling of all when you get a last second winner. It’s even better when it’s a Champions League semi-final. I say it’s better for a fan ‘cos they support the club through thick and thin, and it’s unconditional too. That doesn’t mean the players enjoy it any less - but it lives with fans forever. An unbelievable moment when the whistle went, unsurpassed!

Paul Smith: - I can only refer you to my match report for this answer: “Words aren’t enough really to convey the joy of the occasion. Those post-match celebrations came in three phases. Firstly, the team and the coaches celebrated with the fans. I’ve since seen on TV that Pochettino shed plenty of tears of joy and true emotion.

- The second phase of the celebrations came when Pochettino initially approached the fans alone, before calling upon the rest of his coaching team to join him. Finally, the whole squad, staff and yes, even Chairman Daniel Levy were on the pitch in the corner beneath the travelling fans. Why, I think the squad even joined in with the “Tottenham playing on a Wednesday night, you play Thursdays because…” Well, you know the rest, but it was sung for the rest of the evening before we left the stadium, on the metro and in the city centre well into the night. Those of us in the Ajax Stadium, and those of you watching on TV around the world will remember Lucas Moura’s 96th minute winner for the rest of our days!“

Matthew Childs Reuters 3

Photo: Matthew Childs/Reuters

- Almost too much

Theo Delaney: - I was watching at home with my dad, my uncle and two of my mates that I go to the games with. When that goal went in we completely lost control. One of my children recorded the noises from upstairs in her bedroom. Someone said it sounded like we were slaughtering cattle. We just totally lost all control and ended up on a heap on the floor. It’s a wonder we all emerged unharmed because none of us are as young we used to be.

David Howells: - It was almost too much! I was in the stadium and it was incredible. I couldn’t get a ticket in the Spurs section so I was with my friend in amongst the wonderful Ajax fans! When Lucas Moura scored his third goal we ran out of the stadium and got in a taxi back into the city centre so we didn’t actually see the final whistle. We knew it was over!

On Moura 

Erlend: - Lucas Moura has been a player that has had a few very good games. But he has also had long quiet periods. Against Ajax he went on to score a hat-trick in the last 40 minutes of a semi-final for Tottenham Hotspur! How do you rate this achievement in a Spurs perspective?

Theo Delaney: - Love him. He is an emotional player. It was that quality that got him - and us - through the semi-final. All three goals were utterly brilliant. But it was the second one which combined immense skill, presence of mind and utter determination that I loved the most. It encapsulated everything about him and the team in that second half.

Paul Smith: - The fact is we achieved our passage through the quarter-final and semi-final without our talisman Harry Kane. Lucas Moura and Son Heung-min were the goalscoring heroes of those games, together with Fernando Llorente at the Etihad. Lucas’s hat-trick was not just crucial to his team, but also showed great skill with speed of thought and action and clever footwork in tight situations under the greatest tension. He would say a greater force was at work in him during these moments, and who is to argue with that? Remember also how important a rested Lucas Moura was to us at the start of the season. Remember his two goals at Old Trafford, and his equalising goal at Barcelona which enabled our passage to the knock-out phase? His hat-trick in the Johann Cruyff stadium will live forever in Spurs history.

David Howells: - Lucas is very calm and professional and his talent is undoubted. His attitude has been excellent during his time at Spurs. Many players would have sulked not to be in the team so much but he has always been positive. His second half hat-trick will always be in Spurs folklore now, but even more so if we win the Champions League.-

Spurs legend forever 

Micky Hazard: - Simply incredible, he is a Spurs legend forever. Amazing to do something like that in a CL semi-final. 

Rob White: - I think it must be pretty difficult for any player who is not consistently in the side to come into the team. There’s no doubting the fact that Lucas Moura has the potential to be a great player, but at the moment he probably feels that if everyone is fit then he won’t be automatically picked. Lucas is often described as versatile and has played as a winger, forward, and even as a midfielder in his career. Maybe now is the time for Poch to give him the belief and confidence to find his best position.

- The hat-trick that he scored will be forever remembered in Tottenham’s history, and also in World football history as one of the most dramatic of all time. My favourite goal, apart from the first one, and the third one, is the second one. I’m still unsure how he managed to hit it through all of those defenders… Watch it again. And again. And again.  

IF YOU HAVEN'T READ THE FIRST TWO EDITION'S OF OUR CHAMPIONS LEAGUE SPECIAL, YOU CAN READ

Photo David Howells: Action Images. 
Photo Micky Hazard: John Sibley/Reuters. 


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